Dinah Shore — It Had To Be You- written by Isham Jones and Gus Kahn, 1924

Thanks to ssou02 for the You Tube

According to one of the You Tube commentators,  this recording was from 1960 with Andre Previn, piano; Red Mitchell, bass; and Frank Capp on drums.  1960 seems right for the sound quality, the block chords, and  the piano riffs. I’ll trust him with the rest.  Yes, the picture of Dinah was earlier from the 1940‘s from the look of the hairdo.  She also later went blonde.

Dinah Shore was a huge star in the 1950‘s with a network television show sponsored by Chevrolet with Dinah singing the advertising jingle “See the U.S.A in your Chevrolet…”   She had a golden personality with warmth and spunk.  She always seemed to be a very happy lady.  For more on Dinah Shore see here.

The song It Had To Be You was another collaboration of Isham Jones and Gus Kahn. It was written in that same year of 1924 that I’ll See You In My Dreams was written.

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Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys — recorded in 1938 but only released later on 33 1/3 LP collections.

Thanks to TheVinylVindcator for the You Tube

Bob Wills was asked what type of music he played and he called it Western Swing.  He said what made it different was he mixed up old country music along with New Orleans Jazz.  The Grand Old Opry would not permit  bands to use drums, trumpets, and saxophones in those days.  But, Bob Wills was playing primarily for dances, which were also broadcast on the radio.   This recording of I’ll See You In My Dreams might have been too jazzy even for the A&R producers in the 1930‘s.  It wasn’t released until the LP era, in the 1950‘s.  The vocal is by Tommy Duncan.  Bob Wills is still the King.

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Jabbo Smith and his Rhythm Aces — Sau Sha Stomp

Thanks again to Atticus Jazz for the You Tube

Well, it has been awhile since I posted a Jabbo Smith record and whenever you need to blow out the Cobwebs, you can count on Jabbo Smith.  His Rhythm Aces on this record included Omer Simeon on Clarinet, Cassino Simpson on Piano, Ikey Robinson on banjo,  Hayes Alvis on Tuba, and Jabbo playing incredible Trumpet.  Of course, thanks to Atticus Jazz,  we get a sample of his great photo collection— here a sample from the late 1920‘s.  The recording is on Brunswick, March 1, 1929.

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Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians — I’ll See You In My Dreams — 1937

Thanks to Cats Pjamas1for the You Tube

Always subtle, and sweet.  Guy Lombardo  was where the term “sweet’ band came from.  Some of the commenters on the You Tube wished that brother Carmen Lombardo had sung the lyric.  Louis Armstrong when asked to name his favorite band, said Guy Lombardo.  When the scoffing died down, Louis said he wished he could get a woodwind section to sound like Guy Lombardo.  Lombardo had versatile and  talented musicians.  The Lombardo brothers also wrote many of their own hit songs.

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Ethel Ennis — 1932-2019 R.I.P — Selection My Foolish Heart

Thanks to jazzka for the You Tube

This performance is  of My Foolish Heart is from a recording compilation titled Change of Scene of her recordings from 1955-1958.  The conductor of the orchestra was Neal Hefti, but the rest of the personnel remain nameless.   Ms. Ennis was mostly in and out of music contracts and different companies.  Probably her biggest  claim to fame were tours of Europe with the Benny Goodman Orchestra.  For most of the rest of her career she performed in the Baltimore area, including a stint with a local Children’s television show.

Frankly, I had never heard of her until last year on the above You Tube.  With her talent, she certainly deserved a wider audience.   She passed February 17 of this year.  R.I.P.  For more on Ethel Ennis, see here:

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Cliff Edwards “Ukulele Ike” version of I’ll See You In My Dreams — 1930

Thanks to warholsoup100

Cliff Edwards left home  and school in his early teens and began traveling the country singing in saloons.  He took up playing the ukulele to accompany himself because it was the cheapest instrument in the music stores.  It took time but he eventually became a vaudeville hit.  He began recording in 1919 and made hit records.  According to a historian of the ukulele, Cliff Edwards was largely responsible for the popularity of the instrument in the 1920‘s.

As with most popular entertainers, he had his rise and fall.  He had failed marriages and bankruptcies. He became an alcoholic and drug addict.  In 1940, he was given a break as the voice of Jiminy Cricket in the Walt Disney production of Pinocchio, after which Walt Disney became his personal benefactor.  Disney paid his medical bills, arranged his funeral, and paid for his cemetery marker.

Cliff Edwards performance of I’ll See You In My Dreams is noteworthy nowadays because Joe Brown from Liverpool, England did a very close  copy of the Cliff Edwards version at the Beatle George Harrison’s funeral and on his record or cd.  I take it as a tribute to a very talented man.

See:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cliff_Edwards

 

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Spike Jones — Laura

Thanks to the BassetHoundTrio

Spike Jones plays his special version of  Laura. What could be more appropriate for April Fool’s Day, April 1st?  Presented in loving memory of my cousin Walter.  It’s very important that I play this record on the right date.  Last year, I played it on April 30th.  Also, you get a break from Isham Jones and Gus Kahn.
Thanks to BassetHoundTrio for the You Tube. Thanks to Jim Hollowaty  for whom  this record has  a special meaning.  Here is the one and only Spike Jones.  Happy April 1st.

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Fletcher Henderson with Louis Armstrong — I’ll See You In My Dreams — Another Jazz Instrumental — Late 1925

Thanks to Desdemona202

Fletcher Henderson (dir, p): Elmer Chambers, Howard Scott (cnt, tp); Louis Armstrong (cnt); Charlie Green (tb); Buster Bailey (cl, ss, as); Don Redman (as, cl, arr); Coleman Hawkins (ts, cl); Charlie Dixon (bj); Raphael Escodero (tuba); Kaiser Marshall (dm) Recorded: New York, New York 12/1/25.  I’m pretty sure that is Louis Armstrong soloing on cornet, although I thought he had switched to trumpet before he joined the Henderson band.  The sax solo sounds too bass to be a tenor sax.  Coleman Hawkins also played a bass sax, which it might have been, but I guess he must have been playing in the upper register.  This is a great early jazz version of the song by one of the most talented band leaders and music arrangers of the era.  Fletcher Henderson was ten steps ahead of almost everyone else.

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Goodnight Sweetheart 1931 — Ray Noble Orchestra with Al Bowlly vocal and sketch from a Charlie Chaplin movie

Thank you  to terencenunn35 for the great You Tube

The poster Terencenunn35 did a great job of matching the old Ray Noble record as an ironic commentary on this  older silent gag of Charlie Chaplin and the old Murphy Bed.  The idea of the Murphy Bed was for those apartments cramped for space a way of storing the bed out of the way in the closet during the day.  I was astounded to discover that  Murphy beds are still available for sale, although the patent has run out and the inventor William L. Murphy died in 1957.  The actual Murphy Bed was designed to prevent this sort of comedy but that would make for a lousy comedy movie.    For more on the Murphy Bed, see here.

Charlie Chaplin was of course the great silent movie comedian. My father as a child was a great fan of Chaplin, especially of the movie The Gold Rush (1925).  This clip of Chaplin’s struggle with the Murphy Bed is from the movie One A.M.(1918).

The song ,Goodnight Sweetheart (1931) was written in England by Ray Noble,  Jimmy Campbell, and Reg Connelly.  It was the Ray Noble orchestra with vocal by Al Bowlly.

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Happy Birthday Mom

Thanks to  thevimanaskirmish for the You Tube

Today is my Mother’s birthday.  She would have been 111 years old(1908-1996).  I came along late in her life.  She was born premature on the south shore of Pelican Lake in Orr, Minnesota in the neighbor’s kitchen.  Mrs. Takala showed me back in 1976 her very ornate wood stove which served as my mother’s  incubator.  She put my mother in a bread pan and  placed her on the open oven door to keep her warm.  The Swedish and Finnish immigrant homesteaders had to band together against the common enemy in the North Country:  cold, cold weather.  Last month, it was -50 degrees F and the coldest month in the North Country in many years.

I Remember You was written (music) by Victor Schertzinger  and (lyrics) by Johnny Mercer in 1941.  It was originally written for the movie The Fleet’s In  starring among others Dorothy Lamour and bandleader Jimmy Dorsey.  It was for release that same year.  Jimmy Dorsey also released a phonograph record by his band December 1941, featuring a vocal by Bob Eberly.

My mother had many favorite singers from the “Swingin’ Years,” but in later years her favorite was Nat King Cole.  R.I.P.

 

 

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