Fats Waller — Do You Have To Go

Thanks to cdbpdx

Do You Have To Go was written and composed by Anita and Fats Waller. This version was recorded by March 20, 1941. Personnel included John Hamilton, trumpet; Al Casey, Guitar; Cedric Wallace, Bass; Slick Jones, drums, Gene Sedric, Reeds; and Fats on piano and vocal. A laid back performance from Fats and the band. Nice interplay between Fats,  Sedric, and Hamilton in the middle.

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Art Tatum — Cherokee

Thanks to gullivior for the You Tube

Cherokee was written by the great Ray Noble, British born band leader and song composer and writer. Ray Noble wrote Cherokee and several other songs in a suite of songs in tribute to various North American Indian tribes. For better or worse, Cherokee was the knock out hit and the others have largely been forgotten.

Art Tatum’s version of Cherokee was recorded in 1954 and is available on the Art Tatum Complete Solo Masterpieces Disc Five track 11.

I first heard this song riding in the backseat of my parents car and I immediately loved it. Art Tatum and Ray Noble…both men in a league of their own.

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Fletcher Henderson — Sugar Foot Stomp

Thanks to Heinz Becker for the You Tube

That was the Sugar Foot Stomp with The Fletcher Henderson Orchestra. The Personnel on the record included: Fletcher Henderson And His Orchestra Rex Stewart (cornet) Russell Smith Bobby Stark (tp) Benny Morton Claude Jones (tb) Russell Procope (cl as) Harvey Boone (as) Coleman Hawkins (ts cl bar) Fletcher Henderson (p) Clarence Holiday (g) John Kirby (tuba) Walter Johnson (d) New York City, March 19, 1931.

Since I mentioned Fletcher Henderson as the arranger for Benny Goodman after his serious auto accident. I thought I would play this record, which shows Henderson at the top of his game. This record is at the crossroads between the Hot Jazz of the 1920’s and the growth of the Swing Era. It really combines some of the two.

The Sugar Foot Stomp comes straight out of the New Orleans Jazz playbook. It was composed by King Oliver and Louis Armstrong. It still has the “mistake” from the original King Oliver session where the clarinet player missed his cue and the band yelled “Oh, play that thing.” It became part of the song.

Coleman Hawkins had a part on this record many years before  his career skyrocketed with his successful solo recording of Body and Soul.  With that record, suddenly, after years of toiling in the background he became  an overnight success. (Ha. Ha.)

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Fats Waller — The More I Know You

Thanks to OnlyJazzHQ for the You Tube

The More I Know You was written by Davis and Coots. It was recorded on June 5, 1936. Personnel on the recording date: Herman Autrey, Trumpet; Gene Sedric, reeds; James Smith, guitar; Charles Turner, bass; Yank Porter Drums. Fats was making it look and sound so easy.

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Art Tatum –Smoke Gets In Your Eyes

Thanks again to gullivior for the You Tube

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes is from disc 4 track 17 of the Art Tatum Complete Pablo Solo Masterpieces. This version was recorded in 1953. The song was composed and written by Jerome Kern and Otto Harbach. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes was introduced in the musical Roberta in 1933 and later became a standard. gullivior certainly finds the right picture for the right song.

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Frank Sinatra — Here’s That Rainy Day

Thanks to Sinatra Fan for the You Tube

Here’s That Rainy Day was composed by Jimmy Van Heusen and lyrics by Johnny Burke (the poster corrected it.) This vocal version was arranged and produced by Gordon Jenkins for the No One Cares album released by Capitol Records in 1959. Since I posted the Barney Kessel instrumental version before, I thought you might like to hear the  vocal version by Frank Sinatra.

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Fats Waller — Carolina Shout

Thanks to Dylan Hsu for the You Tube

The Carolina Shout was written by James Price Johnson and was the “admission test” for all pianists whose ambition was to become a member of the Harlem Stride Piano Players, in the 1920’s. As you can hear, Fats Waller passed the test with flying colors.

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Art Tatum — If I had You

Thanks again to gullivior for the You Tube

This is Art Tatum’s version of If I Had You, recorded in 1955 and available on the Art Tatum Complete Solo Masterpieces Compact Disc Edition Disc 7 track 1. The song was written by Shapiro-Campbell-Conelly. The Pablo compilations of Art Tatum’s solo and group masterpieces form a kind of Great American Songbook in their own way. And gullivior has done a great job in the past decade or so of creating these You Tubes of Tatum’s work.

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Benny Goodman — You Turned the Tables on Me (1936)

Thanks to Overjazz Records for the You tube

My friend Jim who was once a bassist in a rock and roll band many years ago, recently asked me if I knew this record. Yes, I have a reissue copy of it somewhere, I replied. Helen Ward briefly was Benny Goodman’s first vocalist. She left Goodman’s band after they had a romantic falling out. From what I’ve read, being a female vocalist in a big band, especially Benny Goodman’s big band was more like combat than a romantic adventure.

You Turned the Tables on Me was written and composed by Louis Alter in 1936. Benny Goodman had released one of the earliest versions. This record came between two important events in the emergence of “Swing Music.” In the summer of 1935, the Goodman band had been on a tour that had been mostly a flop up until the dance they played at the Palomar Ballroom in Los Angeles. The Palomar dance and radio broadcast of it put Benny Goodman and Swing music on the map. Nevertheless,  Benny Goodman was not an early pioneer of swing music. Duke Ellington and Fletcher Henderson had been playing swing compositions since the late 1920’s. But their work hadn’t taken off in record sales. Indeed, Henderson was in financial trouble and had been seriously injured in an auto accident, so Goodman bought his arrangements and hired him. Although this record was not a Henderson arrangement, his work became the backbone of Goodman’s success.

The second event that established Swing Music as the dominant popular music and Benny Goodman as the King of Swing was the Carnegie Hall Concert in January 1938. It was a smashing success.  (Update:  I forgot the last paragraph.)

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Fats Waller — Sweet Thing

Thanks to cdbpdx for the You Tube

Sweet Thing was recorded by Fats and Rhythm November 29, 1935. with five other songs. The musicians included Herman Autrey, trumpet; Gene Sedric, reeds; James Smith , guitar; Charles Turner, bass; Yank Porter, drums; and Fats on piano and vocal. The song was composed by Young, Baer, and Albert. I hear lots of surface noise on this and other You Tubes of the original 78’s of this song. That means the original owners of the records got plenty of enjoyment from these records. This recording date featured Fats in a mellow mood.

 

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